• Manduka Introduces Yogitoes Towels

    Made from (8) recycled plastic bottles and enhanced with patented Skidless™ technology. These eco-conscious towels will grip your mat and prevent slipping no matter how much you move or sweat. Practice On.

    Shop yogitoes towels.

  • Get to know the legendary Black Mat PRO

    Soulfully engineered with a lifetime guarantee. See why the PRO is the best yoga mat cherished by yogis worldwide.

  • Manduka Celebrates Community With 100K Facebook Fans!

  • Welcome Ohm: Home Practice Tips From Manduka Ambassador Kia Miller

    Developing a home practice is a key element in the advancement of any serious yoga practitioner.

    This is a time that you set aside for developing your relationship to all that is YOU: body, mind and spirit. It is a sacred period of renewal. When we commit to a home practice on a daily basis our lives begin to blossom in unimaginable ways. Get ready for the ride of your life!

    When developing a home practice I ask the following questions:

    How much time do I have to practice?

    Many of us start out with great enthusiasm and often bite off more than we can chew when juggling busy lives. Make sure the time you choose is realistic and something you can sustain over time.

    What time of day works best?

    Traditionally we practice first thing in the morning, before the busyness of the day takes over and our energy is pulled 'outward.’ Yogi Bhajan spoke of it as the difference between fate and destiny: fate we get out of bed and roll with the punches of life. Destiny, we get up, we set our energy for the day and attract circumstances that reflect the energy we have taken time to cultivate :)

    If the morning does not work for you, then pick a time of day that does, and try to practice at the same time every day so the routine helps to form a positive habit.

    What do I wish to work on in my practice?

    Pick a theme and tone for your practice. Perhaps you wish to work on heart openers, hip openers, core strength, or postures that help to stabilize your mind. Perhaps you want to work on a breath and meditation practice and you choose to take asana classes at your local studio. Choose what is important to you right now. If you get stuck then talk to your favorite teacher and ask for their suggestions and support.

    How many days am I committing to do this practice for?

    I find it helps to set a goal so that your practice becomes non-negotiable. Just like brushing your teeth, you body/energy/mind need to be cleaned on a daily basis. Sustained practice over time brings the best and most long term effects. In Kundalini yoga we say it takes 40 days to break any negative habits that block you from expansion related to your practice. If you Practice every day for 90 days straight it will change you in a very deep way. If you practice for 120 days the positive benefits of the kriya get integrated permanently into your psyche.

  • The Most Important After-School Class!

    Some of the most important lessons we learn on a mat. The Manduka team is honored to be able to inspire the practice for these elementary school kids with our long time partner YogaWorks. Namaste, kiddos!

  • Manduka's Fall Equinox Flow With Ashley Turner

    Equinox is Made For Yoga - it's a huge shift, when the wheels start turning in a new direction. This is a powerful time to set an intention for the months ahead, so Ashley Turner created this exclusive 30 minute Equinox Ritual Flow just for you. Please enjoy this practice!

    Manduka Ambassador Ashley Turner takes to her Black Mat PRO® & yogitoes® Tarrin towel (available Nov. 1st, 2015) to help us all find balance this season with a special fall equinox flow.

  • A Collection of Nows, Pt 2

    Over the last 6 weeks, we’ve been reading your stories, tweeting your Tweets and hearting your Instagrams in celebration of the moment and all the amazing ways you choose to show up for it. Thousands of you have shared your #NowStartsNow – your testament to life’s messy joys, mysterious beauties and most of all its nows.

    We also teamed up with teachers who inspire us on what #NowStartsNow is all about:
    Now is a Practice of Courage & Kindness, by Talia Sutra.
    Say What Needs To Be Said, by Daniel Scott.
    Being Where You Are, Not Where You’re From, by Hadji Jones.
    Now Tastes Good, by Danielle and Whitney of Sakara Life.
    The Yoga of Now, by Cora Wen.
    To Be Or Now To Be Here Now, by Rocky Heron.

    Here are a few more of your Nows that have inspired us along the way, from springing into action to choosing to pause and reflect. This list also includes Erin Noguchi, Jaime Neal Kaminski, Karen Krieger, Ladybirds Lynn and Marissa K, who win a suite of Manduka gear as our thank you for being present and participating.

    Erin Noguchi, @enronnn

    I'm graduating from University of California Santa Cruz in a few short weeks I'm so thankful for the opportunity for a higher education & I've fallen in love with Northern California. I wanted to take these last few weeks I have left up north to explore & appreciate time seems to be speeding up so it's all I can do to live in the moment & cherish every minute #nowstartsnow here's to graduating, making it to the top of this mountain in beautiful Carmel & taking over the world peace by peace.


    Ohana | I've been caring for my baby cousin the past few days and it's really opened my eyes to the beauty and roughness of motherhood. Two days with him and I'm already tired hahaha! But now I'm pretty excited for my time to have a family. Nervous excited for the future, but I'm thankful for these moments now.


    Bless all the Mothers who carry the heavy load...who give unconditionally...who nurture the children...who selflessly endure through the trials and tribulations. You are Love. #9Months #NowStartsNow

    Marissa K, @Marissaksnow

    Solo in the Sierras. Wet feet from ankle deep snow. No plans. Just a pack. If I go with nothing I'll be back in two hours. If I go with a pack, double that time. At least. If I brought a sleeping bag, I'm afraid I'd never come down. #Nowstartsnow

    Jaime Neal Kaminski

    Take time to enjoy yourself. Listen. Everything you need to hear is right there. "The quieter you become, the more you can hear. #NowStartsNow


    The human spirit needs places where nature has not been rearranged by the hands of man. Places where your soul feels alive but your mind is quiet. Places to love deeply, breath softly, and live simply. The human spirit needs places where the only moment that matters is the moment you are in right now.

    Marti Nikko, @martinikko

    Hey. It's time! #nowstartsnow

    Monica Palomino, @presenceandplants

    I am currently studying for several cumulative finals that I do not feel prepared for. In a few months my lease will be up, and I don't know where I'll live. I have no long-term post-graduation career plan. I'm not quite sure how I will be able to support myself. In so many ways, life is asking me to be afraid. But I'll be damned if I let worries of the future, a place that is never guaranteed, jade the beauty of this present moment. The rush of this inhalation, the surrender of the exhalation. All is well. #NowStartsNow


    My new favorite spot. I will visit here often to get away from the hustle of life.


    My sweet little boy falling asleep outside.


    In sobriety I find Mother's Day to be bitter sweet. How does one junkie make it when another parishes? My mother was an addict most of her life. She flirted with recovery and I clearly remember going to 12 step meetings as a child. But she couldn't manage to get and stay clean. She died with a system so full of drugs her little body just couldn't take it anymore. You would think that I would have learned from that... Instead I took a long slow journey into my own addiction. Alcohol to pills to coke to meth. Eventually I had a needle in my arm on a daily basis. Just like her. In the soul of every addict there is a hole. Something happened to us by way of nature or nurture that left us unable to love ourselves and hence unable to well love anybody else. We are selfish creatures, trying desperately to fill the void. In the end our self-absorption is pure misery. Some addicts follow this path until the inevitable end of jails, institutions or death. A very few of us addicts are granted a desperation so deep that we snap out of it before we kill ourselves. Why did I receive this gift? When I too could have died alone in a cold dark bathroom, how did I manage to wake up from the nightmare? I don't think it will ever be completely clear how I pulled back from the brink of complete self annihilation. This is what make my life miraculous. Somehow it clicked into place that #nowstartsnow, that I could leave the past alone, and live in the light of the present moment. I do know that my mother will always been present with me and I remember the words "I love you Kiddo" as her final refrain. This is her true legacy to me. Souls are complicated. Hers was broken somewhere along the line and even though she couldn't love herself very well, I know she meant it when she said these words to me, that she was trying as hard as she could to have a heart that wasn't so defeated. I think that in my darkest moment, it was her voice that echoed in my ears. "I love you kiddo." I believe that the hole in the heart of this addict is filling with love, a little more each day.

    Karen Krieger, @thekkriegs

    The magic moments of the morning. The light returns to refresh the earth from the darkness of the night. The air feels full of possibility- full of thoughts that haven't been taken yet, experiences you can't foresee, and opportunities that could change your future. Did you miss it? Don't. Be here now. Breath in every moment.

    Here’s to putting our practice into practice, way beyond the mat. This one of a kind moment and your one of a kind life. Starting now.

    Practice On,

  • To Be or Not To Be Here Now

    #NowStartsNow by Rocky Heron

    I find it difficult to write about the “now.” While I sit typing this I am aware that others will be reading my words in the future, which truthfully, makes me feel a bit anxious. And much of what I feel called to write about is recollections of memorable moments from my past. I’m aware that the process of writing, and much of anything else can only be done in the “now,” but how can I effectively discuss what it means for me to be in the present moment, when the process of doing so seems to send my mind moving in every direction other than right here, right now? The irony is, when I find myself truly immersed in the present, in pure experience and in direct contact with this eternal moment, the last thing I feel called to do is talk about it. But I am up for the challenge and wish to carry out this task skillfully. So tell you what. I’m going to pause, quiet my mind (as best I can), and arrive in this moment that is all around me. When I return I will articulate to the best of my ability whatever my heart and mind are able to convey. Be right back…

    Ok. Here we go.

    The now is ever changing, shifting, and moving from one moment to the next, and all of our power to create lies in the spaces between, the transitions that carry us endlessly toward the culminations of all that are in process of becoming. When we sink into the satisfaction of each moment, it becomes clear: all is well, all is available to us, and all is forever becoming more. To be content in the moment means to be non-attached. Not in the sense of attachment to outcome, but attachment to permanence, since every moment is gone the moment you realize you are in it. It is in our attempt to control the chaos - the beautiful, messy, entropy of life - that we resist the blissfully powerful dance of creation and destruction, for each moment contains both. We are evidence of this relentless cycle of birth and death, and our bodies are not immune to this rhythm.

    As I write this I am breathing in new molecules and breathing out the old. My body is dying and regenerating and I am never the same as I just was. As you read this you are doing the same. Fighting this process seems to bring suffering, for it is one we cannot win; while yielding to it’s intimate relationship with your physical nature can make for a satisfying and exciting exchange with life.

    My practice, both on and off the mat is forever one of arriving. Arriving into harmony with this truth and acclimating to who and what I am in each moment. When I let go and surrender into myself and the life that is manifesting around me, I am offered a more graceful and satisfying journey from one moment to the next. It feels better, and it seems to work better.

    To become all that you are is a lifelong and worthwhile pursuit, but understand that all that you are is always increasing. So dig in to each moment and mine it for the rich nuggets of sights, smells, sounds, tastes and feelings that are potently being offered to you. Wake up to the richness of life that is unfolding within and around you and let this string of joyful nows be the building blocks to a joyful life.

    Each moment is so brief, and yet they unfold as an endless string of opportunities to find and experience joy. Regardless of how commonplace, temporary or even frustrating any one moment may initially appear. That is the paradox: that the joys of life are both ephemeral and long lasting when we can surrender to each moment fully and its transition into the next. It can render us appreciative of the simplest thing to the most complex. We too are ephemeral, and our existence brief. So if you could only exist for one moment, regardless of what you are doing, would you not want it to be a joyful moment?

    Get lost in the sensations around you, let go of the habitual stories you may tell about the context of your experience. In each moment you can refresh and start anew but it requires you to make the choice. So remember: Be here now! I’ll do my best to meet you there. If not, hang out for a little while and I’ll be there as soon as I too remember :)


    Rocky Heron

    Rocky Heron, is a world-traveling yoga teacher known for uncanny wisdom and skillful instruction. His teaching is informed by years of study in nearly every yoga style dedicated to helping students deepen and inspire their practice, while consciously expanding in all directions. Visit him on Facebook, on Instagram @YogaWithRocky or at YogaWithRocky.com.

    We want to hear about your now – how you are living this moment as your bold, beautiful, wild and true self. Explore off the mat, start something new, put your self out there and share on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram tagging #NowStartsNow and @MandukaYoga.

  • A Letter From Elena at New York Children's Hospital

    We are continuously inspired by our dear friend and beloved teacher, Elena Brower. She invited us to be a part of this magical class by donating mats for the caretakers at the Children’s Hospital of New York.

    Elena sent us this beautiful letter about her touching experience:

    Dear Manduka,

    Every night I have the luxury of going to sleep with one hand behind my son Jonah's head, and one hand on his heart. He loves that little moment of energy healing, and has always loved it since I'd taken my first Reiki training with Pamela Miles in New York City. Sometimes he requests a placement on his belly, or his shins for those shinsplints as he grows.

    In the mornings, I wake him by putting my cheek next to his, and whispering, "Good morning, I love you." I'd never realized how truly lucky I am to simply touch him and have him so close until recently, when Nurse Ellen Fernando and Dr. Anita Patel of the Children's Hospital of NY came to thank me after offering a meditation, and told me about where they work.

    From Anita and Ellen on our first few emails, "CHONY (Children's Hospital of NY) is the biggest children's hospital in New York, and to say that we take care of the sickest children in NY is an understatement.  We take care of them with all of our hearts (besides skills and knowledge).  Most times we win the battle, but unfortunately there are times when we don't.  The nurses and doctors at CHONY are all incredible humans."

    The following week I took my son to meet the staff at the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit there, intending to offer meditation and perhaps yoga, but we had no props or mats. We all assumed that if the staff could practice calming their minds, they'd be more able to take care of the children with clear minds and open hearts.

    That week we all sat around a conference room table and I spoke briefly about meditation. We sat for 11 minutes, and the mood shifted. We all wanted more. That same day Jonah and I then visited with an infant of 5 months, Rafi, who'd never left the hospital since birth. Born with several issues, his Mama has lived there with him since his birth, and his tubes kept him from being held or touched in the simplest of ways. When we met him, he was intubated and being treated for several critical conditions, and still he instantly melted our hearts.

    I gave Mama some chair Reiki, and we talked to her about our Reiki ritual at night, my hands on Jonah either on his heart, head or belly, and she was almost immediately revitalized. Showing her how to do it over Rafi's blanket and tubes, this gently, she began smiling - and it wasn't just the brave face we'd seen upon arrival - she was happy, trusting, hopeful. She was empowered. The next day, somewhat surprisingly for the staff, Rafi's breathing tubes were removed, and he's been improving ever since, now in preparation for a huge surgery coming soon to repair his insides.

    The next time I arrived, thanks to Manduka, I offered a proper yoga session. Manduka, bless your hearts, thank you for sending us our 10 new EKO-lite mats and 20 "Unblocks" for our caregivers... we had a wonderful session and everyone wants more. I'm now going back at least twice a month but mostly weekly, to teach more yoga, meditation and to spend more time with the families. I'll keep you posted on my wondrous healing adventures here.

    Love, Elena


  • The Yoga of Now

    #NowStartsNow by Cora Wen

    I started yoga practice as a young corporate banker making my way in the world. It was a way to exercise, focus my mind and direct my stressed out energy. I went for asana, movement and more on the mat, and in my life.

    Now, as my practice has matured, I have found that asana has been a pathway to find deeper and deeper states of consciousness and awareness. After 30 years of practice, and 23 years of teaching, yoga is my life within every pore of my being. And my feet have been grounded to earth, as I have raised my arms and heart toward the sky.

    Years ago, I came to each practice with fire and determination to “get” the asanas - Chakrasana, Kapotasana, Vrksasana, Adho Mukha Vrksasana, Tittibasana, and the rest of the more difficult asanas. The ones in the “back of the book”.

    As the asanas came to me through practice, practice, practice, I have found more ease and stability in holding them longer and with more grace moving in and out. Now, I find myself lingering in the asana, instead of struggling into them.

    Now, I can find the time and spaciousness in my chest, side ribs, paraspinal muscles without as much struggle. Though perhaps these days, it takes a bit more time as my body ages and changes. But now, I focus on the breath, the subtle alignment, the way I move into and out of an asana. The journey has certainly replaced the destination on my mat.

    Now, I find myself breathing softer and quieter to find the stillness in each moment on my mat., and in my lie. Asana has become an offering to myself, and it is a pathway that leads me back to the seat of my heart.

    As my lineage guru B.K.S. Iyengar always said -
“Yoga teaches us to cure what need not be endured and endure what cannot be cured.” Now, I have grown older with my practice, and my practice has grown with me.

    Yoga has been my teacher, my friend, and my sanctuary for so many years. My practice has held me as I found and lost love, supported my triumphs and my defeats, soothed my heart on countless occasions and pulled me up in crisis and sorrow. Celebrations, disappointments, sukha and dukkha, all these have happened on my yoga mat, as a reflection of life’s journey here and now.

    Every day we must come to the mat fresh and open to the practice that exists right now, right here. Every moment is here for us to experience the fullness of our practice, the fullness of our life.

    What happens on the mat can reflect into your life, so find time to sit still as much as moving into fierce asana. Find time to move into the quiet and stillness that leads us back to ourselves. Find time to breathe fully and accept each moment as it truly is.

    Now starts now.

    Cora Wen

    Cora Wen is an internationally renowned yoga teacher. She lives her life in a manner that is kind. To herself and all beings. Life happens, so she stumbles like all of us, but the practice of meditation and yoga helps her become aware, and aware and aware... Visit her at CoraWen.com, on Twitter @CoraYoga or on Instagram @CoraYoga.

    We want to hear about your now – how you are living this moment as your bold, beautiful, wild and true self. Explore off the mat, start something new, put your self out there and share on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram tagging #NowStartsNow and @MandukaYoga.

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